Non-technical challenges of medical NLP research

Machine learning has recently made a lot of headlines in healthcare applications, like identifying tumors from images, or technology for personalized treatment. In this post, I describe my experiences as a healthcare ML researcher: the difficulties in doing research in this field, as well as reasons for optimism.

My research group focuses on applications of NLP to healthcare. For a year or two, I was involved in a number of projects in this area (specifically, detecting dementia through speech). From my own projects and from talking to others in my research group, I noticed that a few recurring difficulties frequently came up in healthcare NLP research — things that rarely occurred in other branches of ML. These are non-technical challenges that take up time and impede progress, and generally considered not very interesting to solve. I’ll give some examples of what I mean.

Collecting datasets is hard. Any time you want to do anything involving patient data, you have to undergo a lengthy ethics approval process. Even with something as innocent as an anonymous online questionnaire, there is a mandatory review by an ethics board before the experiment is allowed to proceed. As a result, most datasets in healthcare ML are small: a few dozen patient samples is common, and you’re lucky to have more than a hundred samples to work with. This is tiny compared to other areas of ML where you can easily find thousands of samples.

In my master’s research project, where I studied dementia detection from speech, the largest available corpus had about 300 patients, and other corpora had less than 100. This constrained the types of experiments that were possible. Prior work in this area used a lot of feature engineering approaches, because it was commonly believed that you needed at least a few thousand examples to do deep learning. With less data than that, deep learning would just learn to overfit.

Even after the data has been collected, it is difficult to share with others. This is again due to the conservative ethics processes required to share data. Data transfer agreements need to be reviewed and signed, and in some cases, data must remain physically on servers in a particular hospital. Researchers rarely open-source their code along with the paper, since there’s no point of doing so without giving access to the data; this makes it hard to reproduce any experimental results.

Medical data is messy. Data access issues aside, healthcare NLP has some of the messiest datasets in machine learning. Many datasets in ML are carefully constructed and annotated for the purpose of research, but this is not the case for medical data. Instead, data comes from real patients and hospitals, which are full of shorthand abbreviations of medical terms written by doctors, which mean different things depending on context. Unsurprisingly, many NLP techniques fail to work. Missing values and otherwise unreliable data are common, so a lot of not-so-glamorous data preprocessing is often needed.


I’ve so far painted a bleak picture of medical NLP, but I don’t want to give off such a negative image of my field. In the second part of this post, I give some counter-arguments to the above points as well as some of the positive aspects of research.

On difficulties in data access. There are good reasons for caution — patient data is sensitive and real people can be harmed if the data falls into the wrong hands. Even after removing personally identifiable information, there’s still a risk of a malicious actor deanonymizing the data and extracting information that’s not intended to be made public.

The situation is improving though. The community recognizes the need to share clinical data, to strike a balance between protecting patient privacy and allowing research. There have been efforts like the relatively open MIMIC critical care database to promote more collaborative research.

On small / messy datasets. With every challenge, there comes an opportunity. In fact, my own master’s research was driven by lack of data. I was trying to extend dementia detection to Chinese, but there wasn’t much data available. So I proposed a way to transfer knowledge from the much larger English dataset to Chinese, and got a conference paper and a master’s thesis from it. If it wasn’t for lack of data, then you could’ve just taken the existing algorithm and applied it to Chinese, which wouldn’t be as interesting.

Also, deep learning in NLP has recently gotten a lot better at learning from small datasets. Other research groups have had some success on the same dementia detection task using deep learning. With new papers every week on few-shot learning, one-shot learning, transfer learning, etc, small datasets may not be too much of a limitation.

Same applies to messy data, missing values, label leakage, etc. I’ll refer to this survey paper for the details, but the take-away is that these shouldn’t be thought of as barriers, but as opportunities to make a research contribution.

In summary, as a healthcare NLP researcher, you have to deal with difficulties that other machine learning researchers don’t have. However, you also have the unique opportunity to use your abilities to help sick and vulnerable people. For many people, this is an important consideration — if this is something you care deeply about, then maybe medical NLP research is right for you.

Thanks to Elaine Y. and Chloe P. for their comments on drafts of this post.

NAACL 2019, my first conference talk, and general impressions

Last week, I attended my first NLP conference, NAACL, which was held in Minneapolis. My paper was selected for a short talk of 12 minutes in length, plus 3 minutes for questions. I presented my research on dementia detection in Mandarin Chinese, which I did during my master’s.

My talk was recorded, but the organizers have not uploaded them yet, so I can’t share it right now. I’ll update this page with a link to the video when it’s ready.

Visiting Minneapolis

Going to conferences is a good way as a grad student to travel for free. Some of my friends balked at the idea of going to Minneapolis rather than somewhere more “interesting”. However, I had never been there before, and in the summer, Minneapolis was quite nice.

Minneapolis is very flat and good for biking — you can rent a bike for $2 per 30 minutes. I took the light rail to Minnehaha falls (above) and biked along the Mississippi river to the city center. The downside is that compared to Toronto, the food choices are quite limited. The majority of restaurants serve American food (burgers, sandwiches, pasta, etc).

Meeting people

It’s often said that most of the value of a conference happens in the hallways, not in the scheduled talks (which you can often find on YouTube for free). For me, this was a good opportunity to finally meet some of my previous collaborators in person. Previously, we had only communicated via Skype and email. I also ran into people whose names I recognize from reading their papers, but had never seen in person.

Despite all the advances in video conferencing technology, nothing beats face-to-face interaction over lunch. There’s a reason why businesses spend so much money to send employees abroad to conduct their meetings.

Talks and posters

The accepted papers were split roughly 50-50 into talks and poster presentations. I preferred the poster format, because you get to have a 1-on-1 discussion with the author about their work, and ask clarifying questions.

Talks were a mixed bag — some were great, but for many it was difficult to make sense of anything. The most common problem was that speakers tended to dive into complex technical details, and lost sense of the “big picture”. The better talks spent a good chunk of time covering the background and motivation, with lots of examples, before describing their own contribution.

It’s difficult to make a coherent talk in only 12 minutes. A research paper is inherently a very narrow and focused contribution, while the audience come from all areas of NLP, and have probably never seen your problem before. The organizers tried to group talks into related topics like “Speech” or “Multilingual NLP”, but even then, the subfields of NLP are so diverse that two random papers had very little in common.

Research trends in NLP

Academia has a notorious reputation for inventing impractically complex models to squeeze out a 0.2% improvement on a benchmark. This may be true in some areas of ML, but it certainly wasn’t the case here. There was a lot of variety in the problems people were solving. Many papers worked with new datasets, and even those using existing datasets often proposed new tasks that weren’t considered before.

A lot of papers used similar model architectures, like some sort of Bi-LSTM with attention, perhaps with a CRF on top. None of it is directly comparable to one another because everybody is solving a different problem. I guess it shows the flexibility of Bi-LSTMs to be so widely applicable. For me, the papers that did something different (like applying quantum physics to NLP) really stood out.

Interestingly, many papers did experiments with BERT, which was presented at this conference! Last October, the BERT paper bypassed the usual conventions and announced their results without peer review, so the NLP community knew about it for a long time, but only now it’s officially presented at a conference.

MSc Thesis: Automatic Detection of Dementia in Mandarin Chinese

My master’s thesis is done! Read it here:

MSc Thesis (PDF)

Video

Slides

Talk Slides (PDF)

Part of this thesis is replicated in my paper “Detecting dementia in Mandarin Chinese using transfer learning from a parallel corpus” which I will be presenting at NAACL 2019. However, the thesis contains more details and background information that were omitted in the paper.

Onwards to PhD!

I trained a neural network to describe images, then I gave it dementia

This blog post is a summary of my work from earlier this year: Dropout during inference as a model for neurological degeneration in an image captioning network.

For a long time, deep learning has had an interesting connection to neuroscience. The definition of the neuron in neural networks was inspired by early models of the neuron. Later, convolutional neural networks were inspired by the structure of neurons in the visual cortex. Many other models also drew inspiration from how the brain functions, like visual attention which replicated how humans looked at different areas of an image when interpreting it.

The connection was always a loose and superficial, however. Despite advances in neuroscience about better models of neurons, these never really caught on among deep learning researchers. Real neurons obviously don’t learn by gradient back-propagation and stochastic gradient descent.

In this work, we study how human neurological degeneration can have a parallel in the universe of deep neural networks. In humans, neurodegeneration can occur by several mechanisms, such as Alzheimer’s disease (which affects connections between individual neurons) or stroke (in which large sections of brain tissue die). The effect of Alzheimer’s disease is dementia, where language, motor, and other cognitive abilities gradually become impaired.

To simulate this effect, we give our neural network a sort of dementia, by interfering with connections between neurons using a method called dropout.

robot_apocalypse.jpg

Yup, this probably puts me high up on the list of humans to exact revenge in the event of an AI apocalypse.

The Model

We started with an encoder-decoder style image captioning neural network (described in this post), which looks at an image and outputs a sentence that describes it. This is inspired by a picture description task that we give to patients suspected of having dementia: given a picture, describe it in as much detail as possible. Patients with dementia typically exhibit patterns of language different from healthy patients, which we can detect using machine learning.

To simulate neurological degeneration in the neural network, we apply dropout in the inference mode, which randomly selects a portion of the neurons in a layer and sets their outputs to zero. Dropout is a common technique during training to regularize neural networks to prevent overfitting, but usually you turn it off during evaluation for the best possible accuracy. To our knowledge, nobody’s experimented with applying dropout in the evaluation stage in a language model before.

We train the model using a small amount of dropout, then apply a larger amount of dropout during inference. Then, we evaluate the quality of the sentences produced by BLEU-4 and METEOR metrics, as well as sentence length and similarity of vocabulary distribution to the training corpus.

Results

When we applied dropout during inference, the accuracy of the captions (measured by BLEU-4 and METEOR) decreased with more dropout. However, the vocabulary generated was more diverse, and the word frequency distribution was more similar (measured by KL-divergence to the training set) when a moderate amount of dropout was applied.

metrics.png

When the dropout was too high, the model degenerated into essentially generating random words. Here are some examples of sentences that were generated, at various levels of dropout:

sample.png

Qualitatively, the effects of dropout seemed to cause two types of errors:

  • Caption starts out normally, then repeats the same word several times: “a small white kitten with red collar and yellow chihuahua chihuahua chihuahua”
  • Caption starts out normally, then becomes nonsense: “a man in a baseball bat and wearing a uniform helmet and glove preparing their handles won while too frown”

This was not that similar to speech produced by people with Alzheimer’s, but kind of resembled fluent aphasia (caused by damage to the part of the brain responsible for understanding language).

Challenges and Difficulties

Excited with our results, we submitted the paper to EMNLP 2018. Unfortunately, our paper was rejected. Despite the novelty of our approach, the reviewers pointed out that our work had some serious drawbacks:

  1. Unclear connection to neuroscience. Adding dropout during inference mode has no connections to any biological models of what happens to the brain during atrophy.
  2. Only superficial resemblance to aphasic speech. A similar result could have been generated by sampling words randomly from a dictionary, without any complicated RNN models.
  3. Not really useful for anything. We couldn’t think of any situations where this model would be useful, such as detecting aphasia.

We decided that there was no way around these roadblocks, so we scrapped the idea, put the paper up on arXiv and worked on something else.

For more technical details, refer to our paper:

How to read research papers for fun and profit

One skill that I’ve learned after a year in grad school is how to effectively read research papers. Previously I had found them impenetrable, but now I find them a great source of information about cutting-edge science while it is being done and before it’s made its way into textbooks. Now I read about 4-5 of them every week.

My research area is natural language processing and machine learning, but I read papers in lots of fields, not just in AI and computer science. Papers are my go-to source for a myriad of scientific inquiries, for example: does drinking alcohol cause cancer? Are women more talkative than men? Was winter in Toronto abnormally cold this year? Etc.

Why read scientific papers?

If you try to Google questions like these, you typically end up on Wikipedia or some random article on the internet. Research papers are an underutilized resource that have several advantages over other common sources of information on the internet.

Advantages over articles on the internet: no matter what topic, you will undoubtedly find articles on it on the internet. Some of these articles are excellent, but others are opinionated nonsense. Without being an expert yourself, it can be difficult to decide what information to trust. Peer-reviewed research papers are held to a much higher minimum quality standard, and for every claim they make, they have to clearly state their evidence, assumptions, how they arrived at the conclusion, and their degree of confidence in their result. You can examine the paper for yourself and decide if the assumptions are reasonable and the conclusions follow logically, rather than trust someone else’s word for it. With some digging deeper and some critical thinking, you can avoid a lot of misinformation on the internet.

Advantages over Wikipedia: Wikipedia is a pretty reliable source of truth; in fact, it often cites scientific papers as its sources. However, Wikipedia is written to be concise, so that oftentimes, a 30-page research paper is summarized to 1-2 sentences. If you only read Wikipedia, you will miss a lot of the nuances contained in the original paper, and only develop a cursory understanding compared to going directly to the source.

Finding the right paper to read

If your professor or colleague has assigned you a specific paper to read, then you can skip this section.

A big part of the challenge of reading papers is deciding which ones to read. There are a lot of papers out there, and only a few will be relevant to you. Therefore, deciding what to read is a nontrivial skill in itself.

Research papers are the most useful when you have a specific problem or question in mind. When I first started out reading papers, I approached this the wrong way. One day, I’d suddenly decide “hmm, complexity theory is pretty interesting, let’s go on arXiv and look at some recent complexity theory papers“. Then, I’d open a few, attempt to read them, get confused, and conclude I’m not smart enough to read complexity theory papers. Why is this a bad idea? A research paper exists to answer a very specific question, so it makes no sense to pick up a random paper without the background context. What is the problem? What approaches have been tried in the past, and how have they failed? Without understanding background information like this, it’s impossible to appreciate the contribution of a specific paper.

2.pngAbove: Use the forward citation and related article buttons on Google Scholar to explore relevant papers.

It’s helpful to think of each research paper as a node in a massive, interconnected graph. Rather than each paper existing as a standalone item, a paper is deeply connected to the research that came before and after it.

Google Scholar is your best friend for exploring this graph. Begin by entering a few keywords and picking a few promising hits from the first 2-3 pages. Good, this is your starting point. Here are some heuristics for traversing the paper graph:

  • To go forward in time, look at works that cited this paper. A paper being cited usually means one of two things: (1) the future paper uses some technique or result developed in the current paper for some other purpose, or (2) the future paper improves on the techniques in the current paper. Citations of the second type are more useful.
  • To go backward in time, look at the paper’s introduction and related work. This puts the paper in context of previous work. Occasionally, you find a survey paper that doesn’t contribute anything novel of its own, but summarizes a bunch of previous related work; these are really helpful when you’re beginning your research in a topic.
  • Citation count is a good indicator of a paper’s importance and merit. If the paper has under 10 citations, take its claims with a grain of salt (even more so if it’s an arXiv preprint and not a peer-reviewed paper). Over 100 citations means the paper has made a significant contribution; over 1000 citations indicates a landmark paper in the field and is probably worth reading. Citation count is not a perfect metric, especially for very recent work, but it’s a useful heuristic that’s applicable across disciplines.

The first pass: High level overview

Great, you’ve decided on a paper to read. Now how to read it effectively?

Reading a paper is not like reading a novel. When you read a novel, you start at the beginning and read linearly until you reach the end. However, reading a paper is most efficient by hopping around the sections as appropriate, rather than read linearly from beginning to end.

The goal of your first reading of a paper is to first get a high level overview of the paper, before diving into the details. As you go through the paper, here are some good questions that you should be asking yourself:

  • What is the problem being solved?
  • What approaches have been tried before, and what are their limitations?
  • What is this paper’s novel contribution?
  • What experiments were done, using what dataset? How successful were the results?
  • Can the method in this paper be applied to my problem?
  • If not, what assumptions are needed for this method to work?

3.pngAbove: Treat each paper as a node in a massive graph of research, rather than a standalone item in a vacuum.

When I read a paper, I usually proceed in the following order:

  1. Abstract: a long paragraph that summarizes the entire paper. Read this to decide if the rest of the paper is worth reading or not.
  2. Introduction, diagrams, tables, and conclusion. Often, reading the diagrams and captions gives you a good idea of what’s going on with minimal effort.
  3. If the field is unfamiliar to you, then note down any interesting references in the introduction and related works sections to explore later. If the field is familiar, then just skim these sections.
  4. Read the main body of the paper: model, experiment, and discussion, without getting too bogged down in the details. If a section is confusing, skip it for now and come back to it on a second reading.

That’s it — you’ve finished reading a paper! Now you can either go back and read it again, focusing on the details you skimmed over the first pass, or move on to a different paper that you’ve added to your backlog.

When reading a paper, you should not expect to understand every aspect of the paper by the time you’re done. You can always refer back to the paper at a later time, as needed. Generally, you don’t need to understand all the details, unless you’re trying to replicate or extend the paper.

Help, I’m stuck!

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, you find that a paper is impenetrable. It’s not necessarily your fault — some papers are hastily written hours before a conference deadline. What do you do now?

Look for a video or blog post explaining the paper. If you’re lucky, someone may have recorded a lecture where the author presents the paper at a conference. Maybe somebody wrote a blog post summarizing the paper (Colah’s blog has great summaries of machine learning research). These are often better at explaining things than the actual paper.

If there’s a lot of background terminology that don’t make sense, it may be better to consult other sources like textbooks and course lectures rather than papers. This is especially true if the research is not new (>10 years old). Research papers are not always the best at explaining a concept clearly: by their nature, they document research as it’s being done. Sometimes, the paper paints an incomplete picture of something that’s better understood later. Textbook writers can look back on research after it’s already done, and thereby benefit from hindsight knowledge that didn’t exist when the paper was written.

Basic statistics is useful in many experimental fields — concepts like linear / logistic regression, p-values, hypothesis testing, and common statistical distribution. Any paper that deals with experimental data will use at least some statistics, so it’s worthwhile to be comfortable with basic stats.


That’s it for my advice. The densely packed two-column pages of text may appear daunting to the uninitiated reader, but they can be conquered with a bit of practice. Whether it’s for work or for fun, you definitely don’t need a PhD to read papers.

My First Research Paper: State Complexity of Overlap Assembly

My first research paper is completed and has been uploaded to Arxiv! It’s titled “State Complexity of Overlap Assembly”, by Janusz Brzozowski, Lila Kari, Myself, and Marek Szykuła. It’s in the area of formal language theory, which is an area of theoretical computer science. I worked on it as a part-time URA research project for two terms during my undergrad at Waterloo.

The contents of the paper are fairly technical. In this blog post, I will explain the background and motivation for the problem, and give a statement of the main result that we proved.

What is Overlap Assembly?

The subject of this paper is a formal language operation called overlap assembly, which models annealing of DNA strands. When you cool a solution containing a lot of short DNA strands, they tend to stick together in a predictable manner: they stick together to form longer strands, but only if the ends “match”.

We can view this as a formal operation on strings. If we have two strings a and b such that some suffix of a matches some prefix of b, then the overlap assembly is the string we get by combining them together:

1.pngAbove: Example of overlap assembly of two strings

In some cases, there might be more than one way of combining the strings together, for example, a=CATA and b=ATAG — then both CATATAG and CATAG are possible overlaps. Therefore, overlap assembly actually produces a set of strings.

We can extend this idea to languages in the obvious way. The overlap assembly of two languages is the set of all the strings you get by overlapping any two strings in the respective languages. For example, if L1={ab, abab, ababab, …} and L2={ba, baba, bababa, …}, then the overlap language is {aba, ababa, …}.

It turns out that if we start with two regular languages, then the overlap assembly language will always be regular too. I won’t go into the details, but it suffices to construct an NFA that recognizes the overlap language, given two DFAs recognizing the two input languages.

2.pngAbove: Example of construction of an overlap assembly NFA (Figure 2 of our paper)

What is State Complexity?

Given that overlap assembly is closed under regular languages, a natural question to ask is: how “complex” is the regular language that gets produced? One measure of complexity of regular languages is state complexity: the number of states in the smallest DFA that recognizes the language.

State complexity was first studied in 1994 by Sheng Yu et al. Some operations do not increase state complexity very much: if two regular languages have state complexities m and n, then their union has state complexity at most mn. On the other hand, the reversal operation can blow up state complexity exponentially — it’s possible for a language to have state complexity n but its reversal to have state complexity 2^n.

Here’s a table of the state complexities of a few regular language operations:

3.png

Over the years, state complexity has been studied for a wide range of other regular language operations. Overlap assembly is another such operation — the paper studies the state complexity of this operation.

Main Result

In our paper, we proved that the state complexity of overlap assembly (for two languages with state complexities m and n) is at most:

2(m-1) 3^{n-1} + 2^n

Further, we constructed a family of DFAs that achieve this bound, so the bound is tight.

That’s it for my not-too-technical summary of this paper. I glossed over a lot of the details, so check out the paper for the full story!

Paper Review: Linguistic Features to Identify Alzheimer’s Disease

Today I’m going to be sharing a paper I’ve been looking at, related to my research: “Linguistic Features Identify Alzheimer’s Disease in Narrative Speech” by Katie Fraser, Jed Meltzer, and my adviser Frank Rudzicz. The paper was published in 2016 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. It uses NLP to automatically diagnose patients with Alzheimer’s disease, given a sample of their speech.


Alzheimer’s disease is a disease that you might have heard of, but it doesn’t get much attention in the media, unlike cancer and stroke. It is a neurodegenerative disease that mostly affects elderly people. 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, including 1 in 9 over the age of 65, and 1 in 3 over the age of 85.

Alzheimer’s is also the most expensive disease in America. After diagnosis, patients may continue to live for over 10 years, and during much of this time, they are unable to care for themselves and require a constant caregiver. In 2017, 68% of Medicare and Medicaid’s budget is spent on patients with Alzheimer’s, and this number is expected to increase as the elderly population grows.

Despite a lot of recent advances in our understanding of the disease, there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s. Since the disease is so prevalent and harmful, research in this direction is highly impactful.

Previous tests to diagnose Alzheimer’s

One of the early signs of Alzheimer’s is having difficulty remembering things, including words, leading to a decrease in vocabulary. A reliable way to test for this is a retrieval question like the following (Monsch et al., 1992):

In the next 60 seconds, name as many items as possible that can be found in a supermarket.

A healthy person could rattle out about 20-30 items in a minute, whereas someone with Alzheimer’s could only produce about 10. By setting the threshold at 16 items, they could classify even mild cases of Alzheimer’s with about 92% accuracy.

This doesn’t quite capture the signs of Alzheimer’s disease though. Patients with Alzheimer’s tend to be rambly and incoherent. This can be tested with a picture description task, where the patient is given a picture and asked to describe it with as much detail as possible (Giles, Patterson, Hodges, 1994).

73c894ea4d2dc12ca69a6380e51f1d62Above: Boston Cookie Theft picture used for picture description task

There is no time limit, and the patients talked until they indicated they had nothing more to say, or if they didn’t say anything for 15 seconds.

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease produced descriptions with varying degrees of incoherence. Here’s an example transcript, from the above paper:

Experimenter: Tell me everything you see going on in this picture

Patient: oh yes there’s some washing up going on / (laughs) yes / …… oh and the other / ….. this little one is taking down the cookie jar / and this little girl is waiting for it to come down so she’ll have it / ………. er this girl has got a good old splash / she’s left the taps on (laughs) she’s gone splash all down there / um …… she’s got splash all down there

You can clearly tell that something’s off, but it’s hard to put a finger on exactly what the problem is. Well, time to apply some machine learning!

Results of Paper

Fraser’s 2016 paper uses data from the DementiaBank corpus, consisting of 240 narrative samples from patients with Alzheimer’s, and 233 from a healthy control group. The two groups were matched to have similar age, gender, and education levels. Each participant was asked to describe the Boston Cookie Theft picture above.

Fraser’s analysis used both the original audio data, as well as a detailed computer-readable transcript. She looked at 370 different features covering all sorts of linguistic metrics, like ratios of different parts of speech, syntactic structures, vocabulary richness, and repetition. Then, she performed a factor analysis and identified a set of 35 features that achieves about 81% accuracy in distinguishing between Alzheimer’s patients and controls.

According to the analysis, a few of the most important distinguishing features are:

  • Pronoun to noun ratio. Alzheimer’s patients produce vague statements and tend to substitute pronouns like “he” for nouns like “the boy”. This also applies to adverbial constructions like “the boy is reaching up there” rather than “the boy is reaching into the cupboard”.
  • Usage of high frequency words. Alzheimer’s patients have difficulty remembering specific words and replace them with more general, therefore higher frequency words.

Future directions

Shortly after this research was published, my adviser Frank Rudzicz co-founded WinterLight Labs, a company that’s working on turning this proof-of-concept into an actual usable product. It also diagnoses various other cognitive disorders like Primary Progressive Aphasia.

A few other grad students in my research group are working on Talk2Me, which is a large longitudinal study to collect more data from patients with various neurodegenerative disorders. More data is always helpful for future research.

So this is the starting point for my research. Stay tuned for updates!