CS488 Final Project: OpenGL Boat Game

Here’s something I’ve been working on for the past few weeks for one of my courses, CS488 – Intro to Computer Graphics. For the final project, you’re allowed to do any OpenGL or raytracing project, as long as it has 10 reasonable graphics related objectives. Here’s a video of mine:

A screenshot:

It’s a simple game where you control a boat and go around a lake collecting coins. When you collect a coin, there’s a bomb that spawns and follows you around. You die when you hit a bomb. Also if two bombs collide then they both explode (although you can’t see that in the video).

Everything is implemented in bare-metal OpenGL, so none of those modern game engines or physics engines. It’s around 1000-ish lines of C++ (difficult to count because there’s a lot of donated code).

Edit (8/10/2016) – I received an Honorable Mention for this project!

Some thoughts about CS488

For those that haven’t heard about CS488, it’s one of the “big three” — fourth year CS courses with the heaviest workload and with large projects (the other two being Real-time and Compilers). It’s one of the hardest courses at Waterloo, but also probably the most rewarding and satisfying course I’ve taken.

There are four assignments, each walking you step by step through graphics techniques, like drawing a cube with OpenGL, or building a puppet with hierarchical modelling, or writing a simple ray tracer. Then there’s the final project, where you can choose to make something with OpenGL or extend your ray tracer. The class is split 50/50, about half the class did OpenGL and the other half did a ray tracer. I personally feel that OpenGL gives you more room to be creative and create something unique whereas ray tracing projects end up implementing a mix of different algorithms.

The first two assignments weren’t too bad (I estimate it took me about 10 hours each), but some time during assignment 3 I realized I was spending a lot of time in the lab, so I got an hours tracking app on my phone to track exactly how much time I was spending working on this course. Assignments 3 and 4 each took me 15 hours. I spent 35 hours on my final project, over a period of 3 weeks. I chose relatively easy objectives that I was confident I could do well, which left time to polish the game and do a few extra objectives. I’m not sure what the average is for time spent on the final project, but it’s common to spend 50-100 hours. Bottom line: you can put in potentially unbounded amounts of time to try to get the gold medal, but the effort actually required to get a good grade is quite reasonable.

Now the bad part about this course (obviously not the instructor’s fault) is OpenGL is so incredibly difficult to work with. Even to draw a line on the screen, you have to deal with a lot of low level concepts like vertex array objects, vertex buffer objects, uniform attributes to pass to shaders, stuff like that. It doesn’t help that when something goes wrong in a shader (which runs on the GPU), there’s no way to pass an error message back to the CPU so you can print out variables and debug it. It also doesn’t help that there’s a lot of incompatible OpenGL versions, and code you find in an online tutorial could be subtly broken for the version you’re using. On the other hand, working with OpenGL really makes you appreciate modern game engines like Unity which takes care of all the low level stuff for you.

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